Archive for the ‘media relations’ Category

Cliffs Notes on Value of PESO Model (Paid, Earned, Shared, Owned)

Monday, December 12th, 2016

A client expecting his first child lamented he wished there were Cliffs Notes for all the baby books stacked on his nightstand.  It got me thinking — I feel the same way about the amazing marketing webinars, blogs, podcasts, white papers and newsletters out there.  So many great resources and so little time to review them! I decided I’d start producing my own version of Cliff Notes on some outstanding content.  I promise to condense it down to under a five minute read, pulling out the golden nuggets so you don’t have to.

 Below find Cliffs Notes on PR Pros Must Embrace the PESO Model (Paid, Earned, Shared, Owned) written by Gini Dietrich for spinsucks.com.

Gini argues that an integrated PESO model will help pr practitioners stop thinking of themselves as only brand enhancers and start thinking of themselves as business drivers.

pesoThe PESO model takes the four media types—paid, earned, shared and owned—and merges them together.

Paid Media. Social media advertising, sponsored content and email marketing

Earned Media. Publicity or media relations

Shared Media. Social media

Owned Media. Owned media is otherwise known as content. It is something you own, and it lives on your website or blog.

When your integrated PESO model is working at its best, it can help you establish authority/thought leadership.

Where to Start

The easiest place to start—because you can control the messaging is Owned Media.

Create an editorial calendar.

As you begin to fill in topics for your calendar, start with one large circle– your main topic — in the middle of the page.

Draw six or more medium-sized circles. These are your subtopics.

From those circles, you’ll draw several small circles on each, which will serve as your supportive base.

Continue that until you’ve exhausted all your ideas around that one topic. Then you would have several pieces of content that help extend your main piece and begin to showcase your expertise.

How Do I Use a PESO Model in My Business?

You have the content and you’ll use shared media to distribute it, paid media to amplify it, and earned media to rubber-stamp it.

Shared Media

Twitter: On the day your content is published, tweet the link four times (three hours apart). On day two, tweet it twice, and once on day three.

Facebook: Post your content there once a day, and then consider sponsored content as part of your paid media campaign.

Google+: While Google+ isn’t great for social networking, it’s incredible for search engine optimization. Post content in there once a day.

LinkedIn: Post once a day to your personal account, your company page, your showcase page and to the groups you belong to.

The Others: It’s important not to ignore StumbleUpon, Reddit, Pinterest, Digg and some of the others. Test post in those spots just once a day and see what happens.

Paid Media

Paid media may be in the form of paid amplification (such as Outbrain or Sprinklr), sponsored content, native advertising, or sponsorships of influential blogs.

It also could take the form of sponsored content on Facebook or LinkedIn or sponsored tweets on Twitter.

You can start with a budget of as little as $5 a day. LinkedIn also often offers free advertising coupons to those who use the social network often. Take advantage of those!

While you don’t want to spend money to sponsor all your content, it’s a good idea to test it with one piece each month.

Earned Media

Now it’s time to build relationships with industry bloggers, journalists, and other influencers who may share your content.

On Twitter, create a list of bloggers and journalists you want to collaborate with. This will make it easy to follow them, share their work and start conversations with them.

Create a list of books and podcasts you want to review. Every author and podcaster needs reviews and ratings to gain more traction. They may be appreciative of the work you do there, and may be willing to do something for you in return.

On LinkedIn, create tags—such as “influencer,” “blogger,” “journalist” or “super cool kid”—so you can easily follow what they post and then share, share, share! This may lead to new relationships where you can ask them to share your content later.

On Feedly, create a list of bloggers to watch. Then any time they publish new content, share it with your own networks.

Eventually these influencers may share your content, include it in their own content or interview you for a piece they’re producing.

My personal addition: Don’t forget to distribute the news or content to your key list of editors via email (with a follow-up call if appropriate) and, for SEO, consider an online wire release.

What Should I Measure in a PESO Model?

For each media type, there are different metrics to track.

Paid Media. It depends on the tactics you use under this umbrella, but could include the following:

  • Social media marketing, such as Google AdWords
  • Landing pages and how many people download your content and go into your email marketing database
  • Increases in the qualified leads in your email marketing database
  • New fans or followers who come from reading your sponsored content
  • Leads and conversions

Earned Media

  • Influencer scoring: Does an influencer with 10,000 followers have the same score as someone with 1,000 followers? It could very well be that the person with 1,000 followers can incentivize purchase with 10 percent of his followers, while the person with 10,000 followers can incentivize purchase with only 1 percent.
  • How much Web traffic comes from a story about your organization?
  • An increase in new audiences

Shared Media.

You have to track the number of fans and followers, because sharp declines—or a trend of decreasing followers—will tell you something is wrong. But an increase, week after week, do not results make. The following do:

  • Track the effectiveness of brand ambassadors.
  • Assign points to things such as likes, retweets, shares, and comments.
  • Use unique URLs, coupons, discount codes, or even telephone numbers only in your social media efforts. This will tell you whether you’re getting results from these efforts.

Owned Media.

Unique visitors, time spent on the site, and bounce rate.

  • Email marketing
  • Track downloads and shares
  • Track the effectiveness of a community by whether they’re referring business to you.
  • Is it driving sales?

I hope this can serve as a helpful checklist.  Here is a link to the entire article which includes a couple of good infographics.

Cliffs Notes on Unleveling the Playing Field for More Coverage

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

i-unlevel playing fieldA client expecting his first child lamented he wished there were Cliffs Notes for all the baby books stacked on his nightstand.  It got me thinking — I feel the same way about the amazing marketing webinars, blogs, podcasts, white papers and newsletters out there.  So many great resources and so little time to review them! I decided I’d start producing my own version of Cliff Notes on some outstanding content.  I promise to condense it down to under a five minute read, pulling out the golden nuggets so you don’t have to.

Below, find a condensed version of Cision’s 71 ways to unlevel the playing field and secure more coverage.

Connect with journalists on social

Invest in future

Connect with journalists on LinkedIn with a personal message and like their posts with a genuine and valuable comment.

Follow media on Twitter and Facebook

Share links to reporters stories

Act now

Track journalist hashtags like #journchat  and #URGHARO

Tweet facts, statistics and quotes from your story

Keep track of trending Twitter topics and pounce if appropriate.

 Produce interesting content

Invest in future

Blog often

Guest blog

Publish white papers and ebooks

Email newsletters

Act now

Offer exclusives

Conduct surveys or opinion polls

Provide video or infographics

Use company analytics to determine which topics need to be promoted

Network and showcase at events

Invest in future

Exhibit and connect with reporters at tradeshows

Speak at events

Act now

Hold a conference and promote panelists with video meet and greets

Give back to the community in a genuine way

Remember traditional pitching tactics (this is PR 101 for the seasoned PR pro but helpful if you’re new to PR)

Invest for future

Use a media database

Search editorial calendars

Subscribe to HARO (Help a Reporter Out)

Take an editor out for coffee and listen don’t pitch

Act now

Pitch by email and phone but be concise and compelling and honor an editor’s request for no contact at all or via one method

Newsjack: Tie your story, if relevant, to a current event

Write a timely press release: It must answer the question “Why Now?”

Promote your coverage via social media

Highlight your brand

Invest in the future

Apply for awards

Set up a digital newsroom

Showcase your company’s work-life culture

Act now

Offer demos of products or services before they go public

Consider giveaways in return for coverage

Announce anniversaries if you can also manage a news hook

If you can check off the suggestions above, you’ll be in good shape, but for the complete list, see Cision’s tipsheet.

 

Succeeding in the new media landscape: Five tips from a top media trainer

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

i-STONE HEADSHOT FOR PUBLICATION (2)Greg Stone began his career as a writer at Time Inc. in New York, and later worked as a TV reporter in Minneapolis, Boston, and on PBS. He estimates he has conducted at least 15,000 interviews.

In 1989 he founded Stone Communications. Since then he has been a communications and media consultant for high-level executives at Fidelity, IBM and 3M; deans at Harvard University; rocket scientists at the Smithsonian; inventors at the Worldwide Web Consortium; and numerous political leaders.

In a recent interview he offered the following advice for reaching today’s overextended editor:

1. Offer a package deal: Some daily reporters are expected to produce five or six stories a day. So make their job easy by providing and thinking of everything, including good photos and or videos, quotes, white papers, a ready-to-go spokesperson, and a solid story outline.
2. Tell a useful story: Your story should have inherent merit and provide information that people need or want to know. The best stories have three characters: Heroes, Villains and Victims. For example, the villain for a healthcare client would be disease, suffering or death  The victim(s) would be the patients and their families.  Finally, the hero would be efficient, effective and compassionate care.
3. Don’t be selfish: As a reporter, Greg would find only one out of 50 press releases useful and it usually came from a small handful of the same pr pros. Today, the odds are much worse, so take care to tell a story with wider social implications. Or connect your story to a current trend. If you focus solely on selling your client’s product or service you won’t have much luck.
4. Take away the terror: With increasing workloads, reporters are terrified of making mistakes. Be prepared with sources and statistics and make sure you know your own story inside and out. The good news is it’s easier to get a correction with online stories but make sure the error is not your fault.
5. “Brevity is the sole of wit” William Shakespeare, Hamlet: As a media trainer, Greg advises his client that every answer should be two minutes or shorter. Being concise not only shows respect for reporters’ deadlines, it also forces the communicator to tell his or her story with more impact. The same is true for an email or voice mail pitch.

You can reach Greg at: www.gregstone.com or @stoneidea